UN DÉPART DOUX-AMER

The five days Péter and I spent in Paris before leaving were, for obvious reasons, distracted. (That, coupled with my post-robbery technological deficiencies mean that I unfortunately only have a few pictures to accompany this chapter of the story.) 

We saw some sights - we went to the Louvre, and Sacré coeur. We ate at a bunch of our favorite restaurants. We saw some friends, and spent a lot of time trying not to think about the coming separation. I also did a little work of my own - I got to sit for my friend, sculptor, Skye Ferrante, who was set up in Paris near Bastille, and I did my first voice over in French for a director friend of mine from La Fémis film school.

Péter and I left on November 11th. I left at 4 AM, Péter left at 2 PM. The way was cleared, and my path to the flight was remarkably easy. My parents picked me up in Montreal and we made our way down the Northway to their house, stopping in Plattsburgh for lunch.

Two days later, of course, the elephant in the room, were the vicious attacks on Paris. In places where I could easily have been. In places where some of my friends were. I just thank G-d none of them were hurt. I spent the evening calling and messaging my friends in a panic. When it seemed there was nothing more I could do, I decided to go see a community theatre production of Sweeny Todd instead of sitting in front of the television.

All I can say is I am so glad I wasn't in Paris at that moment. I am so glad that none of my friends were physically hurt, although I'm sure many were probably traumatized. And THANK YOU, Mark Zuckerberg. The "check in" feature on Facebook put a lot of reeling minds at ease. I understand and agree with the criticisms people had about the feature not being offered for similar crises in Lebanon and Kenya, but as someone whose heart and many loved ones are in Paris, this was such a blessing.

Comment